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By: Grace Abaho

In a very energy-filled start, the session took shape as usual.  Raphael Obonyo the morning session facilitator thanked the MSTCDC leadership for bringing together the youth to a learning curve about what they are faced with in the present day life. He told the story of an old man who brought a young man to two circles to which he placed a grasshopper. He said to the old man, look; if the grasshopper settles on circle A, that’s a very vibrant future ahead of you. If it settles on circle B, that is a very painful and very unproductive future ahead of you. The young man after being so impatient with the back and forth moving of the grasshopper to determine his fate rose up and placed the grasshopper into A as a way of saying that the grasshopper, just like nobody, should ever have to determine his fate—it is all up to him. Africa has a very vast number of resources but still underdeveloped, an alarming thing to just sit and watch idly by.

It is very imperative to note, “The narrative should take shape and change from looking at over investing in papers,” as Raphael hinted, “And rather come to a realization that the future isn’t in degrees but in the knowledge.” It also stands out as pivotal to remember that the youth need to learn beyond a career; they shouldn’t have their minds confined into the thinking that just because someone did law or business in school doesn’t take away the right to exploit other areas :  be employable everywhere.

Later in after the coffee break, the delegates were split into two-the group that stayed behind concentrated on topics like Youth and Sexual Health Reproductive right-a DSW led session; Transforming Youth Unemployment narrative; Empowering youth to build thriving sustainable careers—a case study of McKinsey Social initiative—facilitated by Deogratius.

Youth and Sexual Health Reproductive right-a DSW led session.


Sex is one of the most talked about and most sensitive things in the world of the youth of this day and day but a lot of work still has to be done if the intended goals on sex education have to be met; that is how players like DSW come into the equation to make sure there is a more concerted effort to realize these goals. The session handled the basics of ensuring a sexually aware generation entwined in inclusiveness in a bid to uproot the challenges like high pregnancy rates, high rate of morbidities and mortalities, unmet need for family planning and unfavorable systemic environment among others. The delegates were encouraged to go out and be the movers and shakers of things; and not just hold the information to themselves, to which they agreed in unison.

Empowering youth to build thriving sustainable careers—a case study of McKinsey Social initiative—facilitated by Deogratius.


The session focused more on the most disturbing truth about the youth—unemployment; looking at the major causes of unemployment and how the very many problems can be dealt with if we are going to unlock the potential of the youth not just in words but also by action; importantly by action: against the lip-service decorum often seen in our present day world.

The key problems cited in this session included lack of vision amongst the youth populace in most African countries, lack of work experience (an often admired thing by most employers), negative attitudes towards the youth, High supply of graduates that doesn’t match the available jobs on the market, unimplemented policies and lack of courage. The delegates raised solutions to these like tolerance of the ideas of the youth, mentorship and doing volunteer jobs to gain the experience among others.

Learning never ends and as long as the youth keep an open mind, the information gathered will forever be meaningful. It is thus important to say in conclusion, let the gospel of not hoarding information to ourselves lead the way: have an inquiring mind but remember to radiate to others what you find, too.


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